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After a brief hiatus, we are back in Hope Town – at least Nancy is; Goldwin will be here soon.  (We were off island for a family visit and routine health maintenance.)  And it’s busy, busy.  Today was definitely not a beach day.

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Beautiful as it is.  No, too busy today.  First, the in-coming tanker woke me up.

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It delivers gasoline and diesel fuel to the Lighthouse Marina.  But I needed to be up anyway because Thursday is garbage day  — one of three days a week boaters can leave trash at the garbage dock.  Yippee – another boater came by and took my bag of trash for me.

Then off to town in the dinghy.  Low tide at the Sailing Club’s dinghy dock makes for a long climb up.  Standing in the dinghy, I’m eye level with the top of the dock.

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I’m headed to the weekly Writers Circle meeting.  About 20 boaters and cottagers meet to read what we’ve written – mostly based on past experiences.  Today we were entertained with stories about sailing from Bermuda to Newport, RI, coming down the ICW, a beloved cat named Birdie, finding paradise in Minnesota, making blueberry steak sauce, lobstering in Maine, and a favorite old car.

Then we walk over to the Edge for lunch .  Such a beautiful walk.

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Harbor’s Edge is aptly named because it sits out over the water.  I always order Bahamian White Caps – an amazing mix of grouper (or mahi), peppers, onion, mayonnaise, and cheese – which is broiled, on toast (from homemade bread).  Like a tuna melt times 1000.  Others have conch fingers, quinoa bowls, or the BBQ rib special.

Back to the boat for a shower – the water in the solar shower bag is so hot I think I will have to add cold water, but I finally get used to it.  Just enough time to dry my hair – outside in the cockpit in the sun – and then another dinghy trip to shore.  This time, to meet with like-minded women to discuss politics.

By now, the freight boat has completed its weekly delivery of produce and other much-needed food items to the island and the shelves in the grocery stores are no longer bare.

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I take my groceries back to the boat, via dinghy, and check that the solar panels are properly positioned for maximum sunlight – i.e., power.  Now I’m off again in the dinghy, to the opposite end of the harbor for an impromptu party of boaters, initiated by a group from Annapolis.  Here is Motu Iti at the harbor entrance, on her mooring.  The next two boats on moorings are also from Annapolis. There are others.  A blue boat off our bow is from Muskegon, MI, but the owners live in Rockford.

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Some good friends are leaving for the season and the partiers all wish them a safe winter and happy return next season.

As I leave, I take a detour to re-fill the sun shower so it’ll get a full day’s sun tomorrow — when I need to get an early start again to make bread for a dinner I’ve been invited to by a cottager friend.   Also tomorrow:  a farmers’ market with locally grown produce, an art show by local artists, a lecture on traditional Bahamian medicinal plants, a fundraiser for our junior sailing program and the start of a national small boat regatta – all right here in Hope Town.  AND, a walk on the beach and dinner with friends.  Gorgeous weather predicted.

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2 thoughts on “A Day in Hope Town

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